To inspire people to return to nature, to uplift themselves spiritually and to live healthy – these have been the goals of Bhakti Urban Farm, 5415 Wheatley St., since it was founded about three years ago.

“We try to inspire people to adopt a holistic lifestyle,” said Hari Kote, manager of Bhakti.

The farm philosophy map is based on wisdom from ancient agricultural cultures derived from Vedic texts such as the Bhagavad Gita, Kote said.

Bhakti Urban Farm achieves this through sustainability practices, such as caring for land and cows, as well as performing arts, music, meditation and yoga.

To expand its presence in the local community, the farm has a rebranded “Soulebrate Sundays” event that now takes place once a week from 9am to 12pm.

Visitors can take a tour of the farm’s approximately one-acre garden, spend the night at the Bhakti Circle – a meditation program – and end their time on the farm with lunch from the farm. Participation is free, but donations are welcome.

“We always had people who came to the farm on weekends,” said Kote. “There was feedback to ‘brand’ it so people in the community could understand and participate.”

Kote mentioned that the farm has had some sort of meditation circle and Sunday lunch for a long time, but by giving it a name, it is inviting more people to stop by and become a part of it.

While volunteers are welcome on Saturday to tend the garden, visitors who wish can bring their gardening tools to work in the garden on Sunday as well.

Bhakti Urban Farm offers guided yoga classes for USD 10. Walk-ups are welcome, but residents who wish to participate can also register and view the calendar of events on the farm’s website: https://www.bhaktiurbanfarm.org/.

In the coming weeks, says Kote, there are plans to hold workshops on the farm on Saturday or Sunday. The workshops would be related to the purpose of the farm, for example the workshops would be on gardening or canning.

And on Aug. 29, Kote said he hoped the farm could hold cooking classes again.

“We have stopped cooking classes due to COVID-19 and now hope to be able to reopen at least once a month with limited capacity,” Kote said of the cooking classes.

With every new event or program that is added to its calendar, Urban Farm tries to provide a solution to the exploitation of natural resources by teaching people about renewable agriculture.

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