As reported in the July 24, 1920 issue of the Summit County Journal, Eight people were killed and 60 others injured when an American Express special train crashed into a train from Buffalo to New York near Schenectady, New York. The photo shows the wreckage of the sleeping cars and workers searching for the bodies of the victims.
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This Week in History as reported by the Summit County Journal for the week of July 24, 1920.

CAR ACCIDENT ON THE CORNER OF MAIN AND LINCOLN AVENUE

Last Saturday night, Breckenridge had the opportunity to witness its first car accident of the year. HI Wainious was driving down Main Street from the corner of Washington where he had turned, and Fred Theobald, the young son of Mr. and Mrs. PJ Theobald, was riding his bike down Lincoln Avenue when they met at the corner. It was just getting dark and Mr. Wainious didn’t see the boy on the bike until it was too late to stop or stop his car. Eyewitnesses say the car did not exceed the speed limit and the accident was inevitable for both sides.

The boy and bike were dragged about 25 feet down the street before the car could be stopped. He was found unconscious and taken to Dr. Brought to Condon’s office. There were no broken bones, but the boy was passed out for several days. It is currently improving rapidly and will soon be able to move around. The bike was ruined.

THE BRIER ROSE IS RENTED BY JD OLIVER

The Brier Rose claims on Tenmile Range southwest of Breckenridge were rented to JD Oliver this week by owners Mrs. Carrie Levy and CA Finding. The Brier Rose group of claims was very prominent in the early days as a maker of high quality silver, but no work has been done on it for many years. The tunnels are said to be in good condition but are still filled with ice and snow as they are above the tree line.

LADIES HELP ENTERTAINED FRIENDS AT DAUB HOME

The Ladies’ Aid Society had a good number of friends at Ms. Daub’s Thursday night. Music, games and the always enjoyable “surprise bag” could be seen. Delicious coffee and cake were served. A decent sum was realized.

HOOSIER PASS SEES A LOT OF TRAFFIC

On Monday evening, the forest register on the Hoosier Pass showed that 31 tourists had registered during the day. This means that probably twice as many have driven over the pass as few people who have gone very far ever stop to sign up at such places. For the past week there has been a steady stream of cars passing over the pass every day, and it is predicted that in a few weeks more cars will pass through Breckenridge than ever before in its history.

LOCAL NEWS NOTES FROM ALL AROUND SUMMIT COUNTY

A large group of tiger residents enjoyed the hospitality of Mr. and Mrs. Mills at a dance that was given on Wednesday night at Dredge No. 2. Mr. Mills played the banjo and Mr. Gordon Marcott played the violin.

The Summit County Journal office is still looking for clean cotton rags.

Ray Hill and George Bradley returned from Denver in the Hill car on Tuesday.

A group of young people made their way to the summit of Peak 8 Thursday. Mildred Terrill’s cousin, Miss Engle, who was visiting from Iowa, was the inspiration for the trip.

On Monday afternoon, George Penz and Walter Bader returned from Detroit, where they had spent the past few months. They still insist they like this busy town, but the coolness of Breckenridge made the appeal to bring them home.

WOLLMÜHLE CLOSE TO INCREASE CLOTHING PRICE

“Produce, produce, produce!” the scream seems to be with increasing emphasis. It is believed that this is the remedy for our current diseases, assuming there is a global demand for goods, especially in the basic industries. It is with great surprise that we learn that the large mills and factories of the American Woolen Company have closed and tens of thousands of workers have been made unemployed. The difficulty, it seems, is not due to lack of coal, lack of transportation, or strikes, beginning or otherwise. According to President Wood, it’s due to the huge cancellation of orders for the fabrics the company makes, mostly fabrics that ultimately end up in men’s clothing.